So, who are we?

Whether you’re looking for a place for a private event, a romantic date, a special meal or some cultural enrichment, Tmol Shilshom invites you to visit.

Tmol Shlishom was founded in 1994 in an old 19th century building. The café is named after Tmol Shilshom, a book by Nobel Prize laureate, S. Y. Agnon, (“Only Yesterday” in English). 

Tmol Shilshom is situated in a picturesque alleyway of Nachalat Shiva, one of the first neighborhoods to be built outside the Old City of Jerusalem. The buildings in the neighborhood are built from Jerusalem stone, and the archways and hidden niches make it an intriguing area to explore.

We are more than just a restaurant that takes pride in its culinary excellence. Since our establishment in 1994, Tmol Shilshom has been a cultural institution that hosts the top authors and poets, among them: Yehuda Amichai, Amos Oz, A. B. Yehoshua, David Grossman, Orly Castel-Bloom, Batya Gur, and many more. Young writers, musicians and artists are also often hosted at Tmol Shilshom.

Among other things, Tmol Shilshom is popular as a romantic meeting place. Dates, anniversaries and even marriage proposals happen here on a regular basis. In 2008 we published “The Love Book of Tmol Shilshom” that includes photographs and true stories of some of the couples who met here. We even wrote and regularly produce a humoristic play about romantic dates here.

Lonely Planet named our shakshuka one of the10 best breakfasts in the world.

Tmol Shilshom’s uniquely warm and professional staff make it a perfect place for private events, birthday parties, bar/bat mitzvahs, britot, weddings, parties, meetings and conferences. We’re here to help make dreams come true. There are also options to combine performances, plays and lectures with meals here.

Daveed Ehrlich and Dan Goldberg own and manage the restaurant. They both have twins and so the management chair has become a lucky charm for twins. Come sit on it, if you dare.

Open hours:

Sunday to Thursday: 8:30am – past 11:00pm

Friday: 8:30am – around one hour before Shabbat

Saturday night: after Shabbat – midnight